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the technology being deployed is in fact say. some proponents of drones, drowned technology have argued current safeguards provided -- drone technology have argued current safeguards provided a sufficient level of technology. we have on the books, walls we are ready have on the books related to other technologies that can overlap and include this type of technology. remedies that provide similar of it -- civil remedies for violations of the loss. some have suggested the legal protection should apply leg ally to drones. sufficientey may be to alleviate problems or concerns. in your view, is this approach correct and what are the main differences between manned and unmanned aircraft as it relates to the protection of americans for privacy concerns and rights under the fourth amendment? >> think you for the question. we do not believe there are federal statutes that would provide surveillance in the united states. the privacy laws that exist are very targeted. the approach the united states has taken to privacy do not encompass the type of surveillance the drones are able to conduct. advocating fo
time. we have spoken in the past about using dna technology to solve serious crimes. 2007 was a time around /2008 when the crime lab had an enormous backlog of samples. it was a lot of work, but by using technology and with the support of this committee, the fbi has cleared the backlog. a report from 2010 found there was a substantial fbi dna case or a backlog, but an update published in september found the backlog is now very low and well managed. in both cases, i commend you and your staff for their hard work in bringing that up to date. have no doubt that by improving turnaround time for dna evidence, that we are solving serious crimes and preventing additional people from becoming victims. there are many state and local crime labs around the country that have not been as successful as the fbi. i hope that you and the fbi lab can share the lessons you have with state and local governments. i want to touch on familial search, which we have talked about before. this is a method of searching offender dna database system determined its dna from a crime scene has a familial relationshi
and technology industry. he is the keynote speaker at the economic club of washington. you conceive of life -- you can 12:30 p.m.e at eastern on c-span3. >> we can take pictures of the brain with scans and see the whole thing but there is a gap in the between about how the circuits in the brain function to be able to move my hand or to look at you and process that information or to lay down a memory. we do not know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, a lot of this will be nanotechnology, we need to be able to record from thousands of .rain cells at the same time as the brain activity map being talked about. getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together we could not have thought of. >> more with the nih director, dr. francis collins, sunday night at 8:00 on "q &a." >> according to an united nations, 70,000 have been killed since protests against syrian president assad. robert frod testified at a robert ford testified at a hearing. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago la
classified technology. corn espionage as a major concern -- foreign espionage is a major concern here it last week it in response to questions about the website for the hon still times reported, the cold didmay be over but spying not end with it. far from it, says a spokesman for the fbi field office. secret generated by hon still -- by huntsville. they went on to say it is a major target. said doesman paul damon you believe centers like target are specific -specific- centers are targets? what they are targets. -- >> they are targets and recognize that as a significant threat. we have a program called agent in the lab where we host agents to 17 of the research facilities and laboratories around the united states. they are embedded in research facilities to better understand and address that threat. a national security .igher education advisory board the leaders ofte these universities as to the occur at our can target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becomes
, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they , home ofok at tel aviv research centers and startups. [applause] are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. twoy the trade between our countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is the kind of should have israel and could have with every country in the world. innovation could reshape this region. there is a program in jerusalem that brings together young israelis and palestinians to learn vital skills in technology and business. and palestinian have joined together to begin a s
ever before. joint exercises than ever before. we provide security assistance and technology to israel than ever before. that includes more support for missile defenses, like iron dome. it has saved many israeli lives. the american support for israel is unprecedented. it has never been stronger. that is a sturdy foundation we built on today as he addressed a range of shared challenges. as part of our long-term commitment to israel security, the prime minister and i agreed to extend military assistance to israel. our current agreement lasts through 2017. we have decided to extend it for years beyond. i'm pleased to announce we will assure that there is no interrupting of funding for iron dome. decisions i made last year, israel will receive approximately 200 million dollars this fiscal year. we will continue to work with congress on future funding of iron dome. these are further reminders we theirelp to preserve military edge so that israel can defend itself by itself against any threat. we also discussed a way forward for a two state solution between israel and palestine. i will be mee
on technological prowess. that highlighted important continuities in more for that have to be taken into consideration at the outset. >> i mean this with respect. will we ever learn those lessons? early in the thinking about iran -- as i listen to you i thought we might well have learned a lot of those lessons. it is not so obvious that much has changed in terms of the learning, has its? >> that is yet to be seen. ultimately you can make the argument that what we learned from the wars in both iraq and afghanistan will be as important as the outcome of those wars. we do we learn these lessons every time we go to war. the question is, will we be at all to understand these lessons and apply them to how we structure our national defense and how we prepare our civilian and military leaders to deal with future threats to national and international security. i think remains to be seen. there are some major impediments to us learn these lessons. theof those impediments is tendency in the conventional wisdom to view these wars dismissively as wars of choice or aberrations. unless you are goi
mismatch. their belief that the technology is going to fix the problem, i believe the evidence suggests that it is not. the gentleman in the blue tide. -- tie. i worked as the united nations spokesman in iraq for five years. i wanted to comment on the hundreds of billions of dollars that was wasted under something called the project reconstruction teams. they would start something and it never goes forward. never would it be completed. where did the money go? >> won the reasons that we wrote the book was that people had the sense that we are spending a lot, but it's very difficult to get your arms around what that means. when it comes to the reconstruction money, that is particularly hard to think about. just to put it in context, in afghanistan we spent $87 billion on afghani reconstruction, most of which the pentagon, as they put it, had lost visibility on it. compare that to the national park where we spend $2.5 billion a year to support all of the national parks. if you ask most americans, they would say that is a bad allocation of resources. theonal parks versus -- u.s. portion of
because of globalization and technology. and we cannot do these two things, we cannot change the fiscal trajectory of this country and we cannot make investments in our future and our children unless we do two things. first, reform the entitlement programs in this country and second, take actions to raise evenues. last year 13% of the american population was over 65. in 2030, 20% of the american population will be over 65. this singular fact dominates our whole discussion around our fiscal future. just to put this into perspective, if we don't change the trajectory of our entitlement programs, in 10 years they will consume 70% of our spending and literally crowd out every other priority we have as a country. and just to put this in a sharper focus, right now as a country, if you add up all the spending at the federal, state and local level on americans over 65, that number is $27,000 per year. if you do the same math on americans under 18, that number is $11,000 a year. -- 2.5 -- 1/2-1 -- 2- 2.5-1 ratio. i don't think we should spend less on the early elderly. i don't think -- on the e
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9